Welcome to the Circle City Industrial Complex

ccic-lettering Welcome to the Circle City Industrial Complex (CCIC), located at the corner of Mass Ave and 10th Street on Indianapolis' Near Eastside. Spanning more than a half a million square feet, the CCIC is home to a diverse group of tenants including artists, makers, small businesses, and more. 
The Indy Winter Farmers Market at the CCIC
The Indy Winter Farmers Market at the CCIC
The CCIC is open to the public on the First Friday of each month for the IDADA Art Tour, featuring open studios and work by our more than 40 in-house artists. The CCIC is also home to the Indy Winter Farmer's Market and the Indy Urban Flea. Get more details about these and other upcoming events on the CCIC's Calendar Page.

Redevelopment

Purchased in 2014 by Teagen Development, the CCIC is undergoing a comprehensive revitalization and redevelopment effort, including physical redevelopment of the building's southern portion, and a commitment to filling the CCIC's once-vacant spaces with vibrant local businesses and artists. Read more about redevelopment plans here.  

History

Louis Schwitzer (second from right) pictured with the car he drove to victory in the first race ever held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
Louis Schwitzer (second from right) pictured with the car he drove to victory in the first race ever held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
Constructed in the early 1920s, The CCIC was the original home to the Schwitzer Corporation, a major auto industry force during the post-World War I era. The Schwitzer Corporation's founder, Louis Schwitzer was an automotive pioneer who was responsible for significant improvements in cooling, hydraulics, and the development of the turbocharger. He was also a race car driver, famous for winning the first ever race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway: a five mile, two-lap race held on August 19, 1909. Louis Schwitzer was inducted to the Automotive Hall of Fame in 1970. The CCIC (or Schwitzer building, as it was then known), was Schwitzer’s primary manufacturing facility, producing thousands of cooling pumps, superchargers, and other auto components during the golden age of the automobile. After the Schwitzer Corporation closed in the early 1990s, portions of the building were redeveloped to accommodate non-industrial uses, such as offices and artist studios.
The Schwitzer Plant (now known as the Circle City Industrial Complex), pictured in the 1930s.
The Schwitzer Plant (now known as the Circle City Industrial Complex), pictured in the 1930s.